CODR News

Oct 8, 2017

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

It’s October! You know what that means: costumes, fall colors, and Breast Cancer Awareness month! If you didn’t know it was breast cancer awareness month, then welcome to being aware! Because we know firsthand the difficulties that comes with this unfortunate circumstance that can affect anyone, we’ve decided to help spread awareness. Five percent of every job referred to CODR by an insurance agent will be donated to breast cancer research. You will find us in pink this month!

Here are some statistics on breast cancer courtesy of BreastCancer.org:

  • About 1 in 8 U.S. women (about 12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.
  • In 2017, an estimated 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 63,410 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.
  • About 2,470 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men in 2017. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.
  • Breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. began decreasing in the year 2000, after increasing for the previous two decades. They dropped by 7% from 2002 to 2003 alone. One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.
  • About 40,610 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2017 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1989. Women under 50 have experienced larger decreases. These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.
  • For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.
  • Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2017, it’s estimated that about 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.
  • In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in African-American women than white women. Overall, African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer. For Asian, Hispanic, and Native-American women, the risk of developing and dying from breast cancer is lower.
  • As of March 2017, there are more than 3.1 million women with a history of breast cancer in the U.S. This includes women currently being treated and women who have finished treatment.
  • A woman’s risk of breast cancer nearly doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Less than 15% of women who get breast cancer have a family member diagnosed with it.
  • About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1and BRCA2 genes are the most common. On average, women with a BRCA1 mutation have a 55-65% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. For women with a BRCA2 mutation, the risk is 45%. Breast cancer that is positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tends to develop more often in younger women. An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations. In men, BRCA2 mutations are associated with a lifetime breast cancer risk of about 6.8%; BRCA1 mutations are a less frequent cause of breast cancer in men.
  • About 85% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general, rather than inherited mutations.
  • The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being a woman) and age (growing older).

Join the Home Team and help us battle breast cancer!

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Referral Program

The winter season is in full swing and frozen pipes can cause some costly problems. Frozen water can cause pipe bursting which can be a painful repair. Here is what to do to prevent your pipes form freezing and what to do if they do happen to freeze.

Keep the water running

The easiest trick to remember is to keep your faucets dripping when it gets cold. Even if it doesn’t keep your pipes from freezing, it will lower the pressure in the pipes so they don’t burst if they do freeze. Also, keeping the faucet open will help water flow to assist thawing if they are frozen.

Air Flow

To keep your interior pipes from freezing, open up the cabinet doors so air can flow around them to keep them warm. For pipes under the house, wrap them in a layer of foam to keep them from freezing drafts. Keep garage door use to a minimum if your water supply is located in the garage. Make sure where the pipes enter and exit the home is properly sealed. Improper sealing will let hot air out and cool air in. Also seal exterior faucets off with an insulating hose dome to keep them warm in winter.

Thermostat

During the winter months make sure to keep the temperature in the house regulated during all hours of the day and night. Also, if you are going away during the winter months then keep the thermostat at a temperature that will keep the pipes warm enough so they won’t freeze. Make sure all areas of your home are properly insulated and heat isn’t escaping. If the snow is melting on your roof then that means that your ceiling isn’t properly insulated and heat is escaping through the roof.

What to use to thaw a frozen pipe

If a pipe slows to a trickle or stops all-together then you may have frozen or burst pipes. Once you have found the source of the problem open up the faucet to allow water to flow. Then, use any of the listed methods to apply steady heat to the frozen section.

An electric heating pad wrapped around the pipe.
A plug-in hair dryer
A space heater (make sure no flammable substances are near)
An incandescent heat lamp
DONT use any open flame tools.
Apply heat until water flow completely comes back. If you are unsuccessful then contact a licensed plumber to take care of the problem. ... See MoreSee Less

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